Bills Today: A unique perspective

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Here's the Bills news of note for Jan. 13th.

1 - A unique perspectiveBills fans are naturally interested in comparing and contrasting the merits of Buffalo's newest head coach Sean McDermott and his predecessor Rex Ryan. One now former NFL player who is able to provide perspective on both coaches is a former Bills defensive lineman.

Dwan Edwards, who played two seasons in a Bills uniform (2010-2011), began his career in Baltimore under Rex Ryan, who was his defensive line coach. He most recently played the last four years of his career with the Panthers with McDermott as his defensive coordinator.

"Definitely two different styles," said Edwards in an appearance on the John Murphy Show. "Rex kind of carries his own bravado with him. I think the players take that on as well at different times. But obviously it didn't work out that well there.

"McDermott just has that blue collar, hard-working approach. He'll make sure they're fundamentally sound. Rex is a multiple defense type of guy who will show you a bunch of different looks and blitzes whereas Sean is going to be very fundamental."

Edwards said he preferred the straightforward approach of McDermott because it allowed the players to perform without having to think too much.

"As a defense you want to be able to play as fast as possible," Edwards said. "If things are complicated guys are going to play slow, so really just focusing on fundamentals and making the D-line and linebackers play fast. That's the whole approach with coach McDermott."

2 - Spikes: Add staff that proved challengingFormer Bills LB Takeo Spikes played for the Eagles for just one season, but was exposed to the way Sean McDermott went about his business as the team's secondary coach during the 2007 season. He believes being around the kind of coaching minds on Andy Reid's staff that McDermott was that the Bills new head coach will choose offensive assistants that presented him with challenges on the defensive side of the ball. In particular an offensive coordinator.

"If I'm Sean McDermott one of the first things that I'm going to do is just sit back and re-evaluate where they are as a team," said Spikes in an appearance on the John Murphy Show. "From that point understand and know he's not an expert on all things, but he's an expert when it comes to defending certain offensive coordinators. Those will be my guys to go out and find who has the best system and bringing those guys in to fit what I want in the scheme of what I'm trying to do."

Reports have indicated that McDermott has an interest in former Chargers head coach Mike McCoy as an offensive coordinator, but McCoy interviewed with the Denver Broncos new head coach Vance Joseph on Thursday.

The Baltimore Sun was reporting on Thursday that Ravens offensive line coach Juan Castillo will be joining McDermott's staff as offensive line coach/run game coordinator. Castillo and McDermott worked for 10 seasons together on Andy Reid's staff in Philadelphia.

3 - A look at defensive penaltiesWe've quickly come to know Bills new head coach Sean McDermott as a detail-oriented coach who makes sure his players are prepared. His disciplined, workmanlike approach to his profession has paid dividends in a lot of areas on the field. Though not the most important, that determined preparedness is reflected in his unit's discipline on the field when it comes to penalties.

With some help from NFLSavant.com, we took a look at the defensive penalties committed by teams this past season. Buffalo had the ninth-most defensive penalties in the league with 49 (four additional penalties were charged to the defense that occurred on special teams - 53).

McDermott's defensive unit in Carolina this past season ranked 31st in penalties with 29 (four additional charged to the defense - 35).

Only New England's defense were assessed fewer penalties than the Panthers this season.

Like most NFL clubs, both teams had the unforced infractions like offsides and lining up in the neutral zone. Buffalo also had four penalties for having 12 men on the field. Carolina had no such infractions.

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