Coach Jauron- July 31

Coach Dick Jauron
PM Practice- 7/31/07On the fans…
The fans that come out are excellent, and it makes it easier for our guys to practice because, let's face it, they're competitive. They get a little fired up. They want to perform in front of their fans. It really helps us. It's a big change for us.
On Jim Overdorf…
I'd like to say thanks from us to Jim Overdorf, who I thought deserves a lot of credit for what he's done, helping get all of our guys signed. We missed one day of practice with our number one, and that's pretty good. Jim has a tremendous job, every year, so my heart's out to him.
On practice…
But you saw the practice. It was okay. We have a long way to go. I like our team. I love our work effort.
On John DiGiorgio and Anthony Hargrove's injuries…
John (DiGiorgio) has a hip flexor, and we thought we'd catch it early. We hope we did. And Bud (Carpenter) felt that missing today might get him back for us tomorrow or maybe a day later. We're hoping it's nothing serious. At the end of the practice, I hadn't really talked to Anthony (Hargrove). Bud (Carpenter) said he just tightened up a little bit on his hamstring.
On Jason Webster…
Jason had a sore hamstring. We just decided we wouldn't push it early in practice. So we held him out the entire practice too. And it actually pin points really good. It gets some guys out there to take more reps. So we're fairly healthy, knock on wood. Hopefully we can stay that way because that's a huge part of it. You got to be real good everywhere. You've got to be healthy. You've got to be lucky, and play well all the time.
On the connection between JP Losman and Roscoe Parrish…
Well, some big plays tonight. It's a controlled practice, so you don't know what would occur in a game. But I thought the timing was good, and the throws were good. And Roscoe's got unique skills.
On the WR group…
It's always open. It's always open to competition. That being said, there will always be guys who are going to be real hard to beat out by anybody. And Lee's one of those guys. Let's face it, Lee really had a terrific year last year. We have a lot of confidence in him. We look for him to stretch the defense we're playing, to put fear in the defenses we're playing. They have to account for him. That should open up things for other people. If they decide they want to roll to or double Lee, then our other guys have to pick it up and make plays. And we have people we think can do that. And Roscoe is certainly one of them. Josh (Reed) has had a good camp to this point. He's another one. Certainly Peerless (Price). And now in the backfield with Marshawn (Lynch), and really all of them, but really Marshawn's got unique skills. So there's other people that hopefully they'll have to worry about, and if they don't, then we're not going to be as good as we want to be.
On the Kyle Williams…
Everybody has their moments. I'd say that Kyle (Williams) is really a good player in all situations. I think he's good against the pass, solid against the run, very, very smart. He's an athlete. He's a real big athlete. He was a good pick, and we're lucky we got him. Our offensive line, I think, is going to be good. We have a long way to go and a lot of work ahead of us.
On Jason Webster…
He's a professional. You don't start that many games in the league without knowing what you're doing and doing it the right way and then having the mentality to come back when you get beat because you're going to get beat out there. A real good sign for us. I hope it's going to turn out that way.
On Roscoe Parrish…
He's always going to have the disadvantages as well as the advantages he has. He's not a very big guy. We have to be a little bit careful that we don't wear him out, which we could do. He's maybe the quickest athlete that I've ever seen, that I've been around. He has unique skills in the return game, as a pass receiver, and we just have to fit it in. Give him the ball in different ways. We have to get the ball into his hands and let him make different plays, and that's what we'll try to do and walk that fine line between what's too much in practice and in games.

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