LeSean McCoy earns fourth career Pro Bowl nod

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It was a season that got off to an inauspicious start thanks to a hamstring injury in training camp, but once LeSean McCoy was healthy, the dynamic running back was his typical productive self. That's why despite missing two games earlier this season, McCoy has put up numbers comparable with some of the best backs in the league. That production earned the Bills running back his fourth Pro Bowl nod Tuesday night announced on NFL Network.

For McCoy it's the third consecutive year he's earned Pro Bowl honors having also been named to the NFL's all-star roster in 2013 and 2014. He was first named to the Pro Bowl in 2011.

McCoy has been chiefly responsible for Buffalo ranking first in the league in rushing at almost 149 yards per game (148.8).

He has rolled up 1,187 yards from scrimmage this season in just 12 games. Most of that production came between Weeks 7 and 14 when the all-purpose back posted seven straight games with 100 or more yards from scrimmage, becoming just the third back in Bills history to accomplish the feat. Only Hall of Famers O.J. Simpson (9) and Thurman Thomas (9) have had longer consecutive games streaks.

Since 2010 McCoy ranks second in the NFL in total yards from scrimmage with 9,316, trailing only Chicago's Matt Forte (9,416). McCoy's 2015 average of 74.6 rushing yards per game currently ranks fifth-best in the NFL this season.

"LeSean can make you miss in a phone booth," said head coach Rex Ryan. "It's unheard of some of the things he does. You don't see many guys who can do that.  Shady has got speed, balance, all this type of stuff. It's hard to touch him. God blessed him and gave him an unusual skill set."

McCoy is the first Bills running back to go to the Pro Bowl since C.J. Spiller went in 2013.

The 2016 Pro Bowl will be played on Sunday, Jan. 31st at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii and will air on ESPN. The selection of teams by NFL Legends will continue as the rosters will remain unconferenced.

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